Free medical tests please Gugs residents

Guglethu residents were on cloud nine last Saturday when they received free medical treatment in an event organised by Africa Unite together with University of Cape Town medical students.

The event which was held at the local sport complex was part of celebrating Mandela Month.

Human rights manager at Africa Unite, Brilliant Nyambi, described the event as part of bringing services closer to the people.

“Mandela had a vision of all people living in peace and getting service delivery. And today we are doing exactly that: Examining them free and giving them free medication. And if there is a need we also transfer them to the nearest clinics,” said Nyambi.

He said they are honouring Madiba’s dream of assisting the community where they can.

“Some people don’t have money to go to see the doctors and having such events means a lot to them.

“Everything we do is secretive. We don’t need to know their names or addresses. We only examine them and gave them medication if it is needed,” he said.

Nyambi explained that they visit different areas, especially townships and farming areas.

The deputy head at the Students Health and Welfare Centre Organisation and a third year UCT medical student, Robyn Kamail, said their aim is to improve the quality of life for individuals in developing communities within the Cape Metropolitan area­.

“Today we open a pop-up clinic where we visit communities and see patients who don’t have resources or the time to going to the clinics­.

“It’s very like primary health care level. We do testing like HIV/Aids, prognostic, deep sticks, also provide antibiotics and examinations,” she said.

She said they educate the community on how to sustain healthy living.

Lucy Mtabane (59), a patient, described the event as helpful to the community.

“I was here to test my high blood pressure. I didn’t stay long in the queue, they are quick. I wish they can come every month. Some of us are unemployed, we don’t have money to see the doctor every time.”