Gruelling course for fire fighters

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis. The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park. Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round. They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, types of equipment used for this task, and the basics of specific roles and functions of each staff member.

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis.

The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park.

“Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

“Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round.

They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, the different types of equipment used for this task.

The course also addresses the basics of the 101 specific roles and functions of each staff member when responding to a vegetation fire.

The seasonal firefighters will be on duty from December to the end of April next year, says Smith.

“The Western Cape is prone to wildfires over the summer period. Our seasonal firefighters are crucial to protecting the urban edge when those fires happen.

“Over the years, our Fire and Rescue Service has developed this programme into a well-oiled machine that has delivered some top-class performers.

“Best of luck to the applicants this year, and for those who do not make it this time around, don’t give up and give it a try again next year,” adds Smith.

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis.

The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park.

“Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

“Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round.

They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, the different types of equipment used for this task.

The course also addresses the basics of the 101 specific roles and functions of each staff member when responding to a vegetation fire.

The seasonal firefighters will be on duty from December to the end of April next year, says Smith.

“The Western Cape is prone to wildfires over the summer period. Our seasonal firefighters are crucial to protecting the urban edge when those fires happen. Over the years, our Fire and Rescue Service has developed this programme into a well-oiled machine that has delivered some top-class performers. Best of luck to the applicants this year, and for those who do not make it this time around, don’t give up and give it a try again next year,” adds Smith.

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme. With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis. The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected. Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park. Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude. Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round. They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, the different types of equipment used for this task, and the basics of the 101 specific roles and functions of each staff member when responding to a vegetation fire.

The seasonal firefighters will be on duty from December to the end of April next year. “The Western Cape is prone to wildfires over the summer period. Our seasonal firefighters are crucial to protecting the urban edge when those fires happen. Over the years, our Fire and Rescue Service has developed this programme into a well-oiled machine that has delivered some top-class performers.”

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis.

The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park.

“Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

“Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round.

They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, the different types of equipment used for this task.

The course also addresses the basics of the 101 specific roles and functions of each staff member when responding to a vegetation fire.

The seasonal firefighters will be on duty from December to the end of April next year, says Smith.

“The Western Cape is prone to wildfires over the summer period. Our seasonal firefighters are crucial to protecting the urban edge when those fires happen. Over the years, our Fire and Rescue Service has developed this programme into a well-oiled machine that has delivered some top-class performers. Best of luck to the applicants this year, and for those who do not make it this time around, don’t give up and give it a try again next year,” adds Smith.

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis.

The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park.

“Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

“Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round.

They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, the different types of equipment used for this task.

The course also addresses the basics of the 101 specific roles and functions of each staff member when responding to a vegetation fire.

The seasonal firefighters will be on duty from December to the end of April next year, says Smith.

“The Western Cape is prone to wildfires over the summer period. Our seasonal firefighters are crucial to protecting the urban edge when those fires happen. Over the years, our Fire and Rescue Service has developed this programme into a well-oiled machine that has delivered some top-class performers. Best of luck to the applicants this year, and for those who do not make it this time around, don’t give up and give it a try again next year,” adds Smith.

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

With an eager, hardworking spirit, scores of prospective seasonal firefighters are participating in the physical assessments this week for a spot in the next round of the recruitment process.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis.

The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year.

An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park.

“Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

“Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.

Once the physical assessments have been completed, candidates who have passed are then moved on to the next round.

They have to write a test and give an interview before the final selection and training can commence.

A wild-land firefighting course is presented over four weeks, addressing the basics of combating vegetation fires, the different types of equipment used for this task.

The course also addresses the basics of the 101 specific roles and functions of each staff member when responding to a vegetation fire.

The seasonal firefighters will be on duty from December to the end of April next year, says Smith.

“The Western Cape is prone to wildfires over the summer period. Our seasonal firefighters are crucial to protecting the urban edge when those fires happen. Over the years, our Fire and Rescue Service has developed this programme into a well-oiled machine that has delivered some top-class performers. Best of luck to the applicants this year, and for those who do not make it this time around, don’t give up and give it a try again next year,” adds Smith.

The City of Cape Town’s Fire and Rescue Service offered its services last week to guide more than 1000 participants through the first step of the application process for the City’s Seasonal Firefighters programme.

Each year, the Fire and Rescue Service recruits 120 seasonal firefighters on a contract basis.

The seasonal firefighters’ duties require them to assist with fighting the increase in wildfires during the warmer months of the year. An average of 1500 hopefuls arrive for the physical assessments each year, whereas only 120 of the individuals are selected.

Requirements for applicants are to do a 1.9m reach test, 2.4km run in 11 minutes (men) or 12 minutes (women), 30 push-ups in 60 seconds, 30 sit-ups in 60 seconds, and carry two 25 km of dead weight over a distance of 100m.

“This is the standard physical assessment for anyone applying for an operational position within the City’s Safety and Security Directorate and it is no walk in the park.

“Testament to this is the fact that only a few hundred applicants will be left standing by the time the physical trials conclude.

“Fighting wildfires is a physically demanding task and often requires many hours on the front line, so this physical assessment is a key element in the recruitment process,” says Mayco member for safety, security and social services, JP Smith.