Throw small users a lifeline

I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid metre on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000”. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free. The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

DRIES Email

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek

Similar to C Truscott (“Tarriff increase doesnt add up”, People’s Post, 17 July) I bought my month’s supply of electricity for the prepaid meter on 1 July and in the same way discovered that I had only received half the number of KWh units than the month before – for exactly the same money.

Similarly, I tried to call the City but gave up.

Again, in a similar way, I went onto their website but with a bit of luck this time, I came across the paragraph that explains exactly what happened to me, Truscott and I assume thousands of other trusting and unsuspecting Cape Town residents.

In short, the tariffs did only go up by about 8% but without warning or publication, the council changed the tariff group rules with the effect that almost all people who were previously classified as “Lifeline” users, are now plain and simply “Domestic” users. Previously, “Lifeline” users (or what the group was called before) were small user (less than 450 KWh per month) with 40 AMP supply (look at your main breaker). That got you 25KWh “free” and a low tariff up to 450 KWh.

What has changed is that the council added (sneaked) a new clause into the regulations that adds “and only those who live in a place with a municipal valuation of less than R400 000” – which I assume is just about all the Cape Town residents not living in RDP houses or temporary shelters. This change now puts these residents into the standard “Domestic” users group where we do not get the 25KWh free (I can live with that) but where the tariff is practically double.

The residents living in one and two bedroom units who were previously small (Lifeline) users, now pay the same tariff as the four bedroom house across the road.

And they didn’t bother to tell us, or involve us beforehand. I wonder, was this an oversight or is there method in this madness?

I have a question for the council: Is this “Lifeline” thing for which I must now apply a new thing? If so, who did you tell?

So, as for the comments from C Truscott, you were caught for a sucker as well like the rest of us and obviously, your municipal valuation must be more than R400 000 so you probably live in a place bigger than a double garage.

My apologies if this sounds cynical but I do feel deliberately mislead and disrespected. Can the City tell us what the impact of this is on their earnings? Who needs a tariff hike if you can simply double your income from 40% (I guess?) of your users? Thinking about it now, I am actually not apologising for being upset and angry.

If I need to be corrected on my understanding of the City’s rates, please enlighten me – but only if there is some good news somewhere in there.

Dries Fish Hoek