On an impotent police force

AN army officer opposed the imposition of martial law in South Africa as the army uses force.

However, this is the solution for the prevention and halting of arson destroying educational institutions, government property, private businesses and transport systems.

The inhabitants of the Cape Flats are in dire need of safety. The police force (no longer a force) is impotent as crime has escalated.

If the residents are cognisant of the names and dwellings of the drug lord and pedlars, then so is the police.

As no action is taken against these alleged gangsters, then it is evident that the police is working hand in hand with them. This was the obvious situation prevailing on the south coast of Natal.

An innocent, dedicated, compassionate local police officer whose goal was to rid society of vermin — the drug lords and pedlars — exercising self defence (advocated by the Minister of Police), has been incarcerated in prison for more than a year.

His fellow police officers, who refused to testify in his favour, are no doubt the alleged supporters of the drug lords and drug pedlars. Their aim, a common goal in South Africa, using corruption to enrich themselves by sacrificing health, safety and the lives of the people.

Police members are implicated in innumerable crimes, even in the recent spate of cash in transport heists. Do readers recall the arrest of eight highest ranking police officers for monetary offences!

In accordance with the law, no one is permitted to wear a police uniform unless one has undergone police training. This is impersonating a police officer (Section 41(5) of NPA Act). A police person must “work through the ranks” for promotion.

However, South Africa infringes its Constitutional law by appointing Ministers of Police, wearing the insignia of the highest rank, who have not attended training and who have not performed duty.

This situation has prevailed from the appointment of Jackie Selebi who, despite being head of Interpol, was involved in drug trafficking. Our present Minister of Police underwent the training and the promotion process.

How I long to stroll around after dark, instead of being incarcerated behind burglar bars in a South African home, where one’s movements are restricted to a few unarmed areas! Windows are permanently sealed. Fresh air is a luxury of the past.

DR L.J. PELTZ

Lower South Coast