Darren Goddard sexual assault case: one boy had STD

A medical doctor says he found signs suggestive of sexual assault on at least four school boys who claim to have been victims of alleged sex abuser Darren Goddard, and one boy was prescribed medication for a sexually transmitted disease.

Dr Akintunde Akinola, who is head of the Thuthuzela Care Centre at Edendale Hospital, had even found one alleged victim to have suffered post-traumatic stress disorder because of his alleged ordeal, after he had shown signs of mood swings and bed wetting.

Another boy was shown to have been “notably fearful” during his examination.

Akinola told the Pietermaritzburg high court on Thursday that he had examined five alleged victims between July 2016 and August that year, around the time Goddard was arrested. The five boys were brought to him after alleging to their parents they had been sexually abused.

Regarding the fifth boy, Akinola said he could “not exclude nor confirm” sexual abuse based on his findings.

Goddard faces 15 counts in total, one of accessing child pornography, another of being in possession of child pornography, and the rest of sexual assault and rape. The incidents allegedly took place between 2012 and 2016 when Goddard was a counsellor at a local school.

He has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Akinola said under questioning from state advocate Attie Truter that four out of the five boys were reserved and “not forthcoming with information” during examinations. One boy had alleged to Akinola during a visit in July 2016 that a “grown-up coloured man had pulled down his pants and touched him”.

“He alleged the man who was counselling him at his school asked him to close his eyes and put sand in his mouth,” Akinola said. “But when his mom came into the room, he said it was a dream.”

When Truter asked why the boy changed his story, Akinola said he did not know. Akinola alleged another boy told him that “his counsellor had kissed him and touched his genitals and bum”.

The doctor said in response to a question by Truter that signs like scarring would not necessarily be present after sexual abuse. Akinola later agreed, however, during cross examination by Goddard’s advocate, Shane Matthews, that a finding of sexual abuse was based more on the “story one is told, and never solely on the examination”.

Matthews read this from a statement made by head of paediatrics in KZN, Dr Neil McKerrow.

“We use examinations to corroborate the story. The most important thing is to get the history [of abuse] from the child.”

Mathews also questioned technical aspects of Akinola’s testimony, such as his use of certain methods which suggested sexual abuse that have since been deemed outdated. Akinola said doctors do, however, “exclude other factors” when drawing a conclusion of sexual assault.

The trial resumes on Monday.