#StateCaptureInquiry: Manyi wants opportunity to 'place his version on record'

Former Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) CEO Mzwanele Manyi has confirmed that he has formally written to the judicial commission of inquiry on state capture asking for an opportunity to "place his version on record".

Manyi was implicated by acting GCIS CEO Phumla Williams during her testimony on Friday, August 31.

Manyi told News24 on Wednesday evening that he had written to the commission twice since Friday.

He said he wanted to respond to the controversy surrounding the text he sent Williams during her testimony as well as to her overall testimony.

Williams told the commission that Manyi sent her a text message while she was giving evidence. This after she had implicated him, telling the inquiry that he had irregularly changed the tender processes at the GCIS, placing all final decisions under him.

Williams implied that Manyi was trying to "influence" her testimony.

Affidavit explains 'circumstances' around text

"I got a text message from Manyi who is saying that I must say the TNA breakfasts did not happen in his time. It is my view that he is trying to influence my submission," Williams said at the time.

Manyi replaced Themba Maseko in 2011, who was fired after he defied an instruction by former president Jacob Zuma to "help" the Guptas, who were demanding that GCIS media spend be channelled to The New Age newspaper.

"On Friday, I wrote to advocate Busani Mabunda to request an opportunity to table my version of activities at GCIS. On Sunday, I also wrote a sworn affidavit to explain the circumstances around my text to Phumla. On the same affidavit I also reconfirmed my request to be given an opportunity to table my story on the main issue that was the testimony that Phumla gave on Friday," he said.

He said the affidavit also served as another request for him to be given an opportunity to place his version on record at the commission.

Manyi said he had earlier on Friday called Williams with an intention to ask her that after the break, she needed to indicate the chronology of events to the commission.

"Unfortunately, she did not pick up my call. Out of desperation to ensure that there is no conflation of issues and misleading the chair and the commission, I went further and texted her. I express shock and serious disappointment that Ms Phumla Williams has maliciously misconstrued my noble intentions and has now created a wrong impression that I was trying to influence her testimony," he said.

The commission is expected to resume on Thursday where the chairperson of the commission, Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo, will hear applications for leave to cross-examine witnesses by implicated in testimony.