Newlywed raises R1.9 million to save his life after terminal diagnosis

A young man is desperately trying to raise R1.8 million to save his own life after receiving a diagnosed of incurable cancer.

Adam Long, from Britain, recently tied the knot with his partner of eight years, Georgia (24), after realising his cancer treatment was unlikely to prolong his life for much longer.

After initially being diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer three years ago, the 26-year-old surpassed doctors’ expectations.

But Adam’s tumours continued to grow and he was told that chemotherapy wouldn’t help prolong his life any further.

Desperate to stay alive, the former rugby player found lifesaving treatment called immunotherapy – which uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer by using specialist drugs and therapies.

However, the drug for the treatment is not currently available on the NHS (National Health Services) for his type of cancer.

The devastated construction assistant never imagined he’d be able to raise funds but after just one week, the newlywed has already hit the halfway mark.

"I never imagined I'd be fundraising to save my own life at 26 but it's amazing how much we've raised so far,” said Adam.

"I’ve tried five different chemotherapy drugs and undergoing two major surgeries to remove tumours but I haven’t been cancer-free since I was diagnosed.

"I know I can't prolong my life forever with the drugs I've already tried and after researching immunology I'm hoping that will give me my life back.

“I don’t want to die. I have so many things to live for and so many things I want to experience. I only got married four weeks ago and I’m not ready to leave this world just yet.

"Once I reach £100,000 (around R1.9 million) I will be able to fund the drugs that might finally get me into remission, it's the only chance I've got. I'm so grateful to my amazing wife, friends, and family for how well the fundraising page has done so far.”

Adam was first diagnosed with pancreatic cancer after battling symptoms such as dramatic weight loss and swelling in his stomach.

"I lost about four to five stone (25-30kg) in just a few months and people had started to comment on how awful I looked.

"After returning from holiday and noticing that my stomach had swelled and my weight had plummeted drastically, I finally visited the hospital.

"I underwent tests and was quickly diagnosed with widespread cancer, which took over a year to correctly diagnose due to the complexity of the disease, but we now know it arose from a neuroendocrine cell type from my pancreas.

“Everyone was so shocked that I had cancer, I was a fit and healthy rugby player but somehow I had an aggressive form of the disease,” he said.

Adam says he's grateful for all the support from his friends and family.

“Thankfully Georgia was supportive and refused to believe it was incurable and we've been defying the doctors ever since,” Adam says.

“It's amazing how much everyone cares and I hope I’m making a massive impact on everyone around me. I’ve been in the gym most weeks since my diagnosis as I'm determined to stay as fit and healthy as possible.

“Before diagnosis, I looked and felt awful but looking at me now you'd never know I was battling cancer. The doctors don't yet know how my type of rare cancer will react to immunotherapy but we're all optimistic.”

Source: Magazine Features, Pictures: CATERS/WWW.MAGAZINEFEATURES.CO.Z